Showing posts with label Consumer. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Consumer. Show all posts

Medical Service Provider Corruption - Patients Forced to Sign SWAG Medical Contracts Under Duress

[This page was originally entitled "Medical Imaging and Diagnostic Centers Saying Medicare Part B Reneges on Paying for Preventative Services" and was about a local incident. The page has since been expanded to address other local incidents and as they relate to the national issue. Bottom of the page has a list of government bookmarks for helping patients deal with unethical medical conduct. Page may occasionally be updated as more information comes to light.

The problem is the medical service provider is trying to
make the patient responsible for Medicare's conduct.

October 13, 2016 (first local incident)

Per doctor's written instructions, I went to an imaging/diagnostic center (name temporarily redacted) for chest/lung X-rays. I had been to this place before a couple years ago and there hadn't been any problems.

As with most medical service providers, I was first directed to the Hallowed Contract Signing Room. And there is where everything fell apart...

They placed a contract in front of me that basically said (paraphrasing):
  • We will take the X-rays.
  • We will bill Medicare.
  • Medicare will then decide if the X-rays were medically necessary or not.
  • If Medicare unilaterally decides the X-rays were not necessary and refuses to pay, then you must pay instead.
  • If you refuse to sign this contract, we will refuse to do the X-rays your doctor ordered.
In other words, the imaging/diagnostic center is claiming:
  • That Medicare no longer considers a doctor's word or judgement good enough.
  • That Medicare sometimes reneges on payments and that I am supposed to protect the imaging/diagnostic center from this by agreeing to pay them myself in such cases.

I felt sympathy for the woman at the desk, I knew she was just following orders.

So, is this a Medicare issue or is this an imaging/diagnostic centers issue? Or maybe it is only this one service provider that is pulling this stunt and Medicare is being falsely accused? [Incident is sorted out in next section.]

As a side note, I asked for a copy of the contract to show the doctor as to why I didn't get the X-rays and the imaging/diagnostic center flatly refused.

October 27, 2016 (second local incident)

Per doctor's written instructions, I went to a local blood lab (name temporarily redacted) this morning. While in the back room, they came in with a contract saying certain medical codes were missing and I would have to agree to pay for what Medicare wouldn't pay because of the missing codes. I declined, at which point they said they would contact the referring doctor's office and get the codes.

They then came back and said they had got the codes and proceeded to take my blood. I never had to sign anything and all appeared well.

When I got home, it occurred to me to call the doc's office to see if the blood lab really did call them and get the codes.The Doc's Office Said They Never Received Any Such Call. They further said they would look into and deal with it, and that I would not be responsible for any bills.

I'll wait to see how this sorts out before acting further. I never signed or agreed to anything. So if I do receive any sort of bill, I will perceive it as attempted fraud on the part of the blood lab and will indeed name names, unlike my still withholding the name of the imaging/diagnostic center.

When I first reported about this second incident, I received input from others stating such things as...
  • They have been nothing but trouble for people with Medicare or PPO health insurance.
  •  Credit card numbers demanded in advance before agreeing to do blood work.
  • Collection agencies being used on unwarranted/disputed bills.
This incident is considerably worse than the first incident, in fact it makes the first incident pale by comparison. I'm waiting to see how my situation turns out before acting accordingly.

November 15, 2016 update: still no bill received.

Early November, 2016 (third local incident)

Per doc's referral, I went to an eye doctor place (name temporarily redacted) and made an appointment. After making the appointment, I then perused their frames selection. The prices were literally double to triple the prices that can be found elsewhere, presumably the lens prices would be equally exorbitant.

The place was packed with patients/customers, noticing that caused me conflicted emotions...
  • On the one hand, I am pro capitalism. If a business entity discovers an unending supply of customers who voluntarily pay double to triple the going rate for a product or service, then you really can't fault the business entity for taking advantage of that.
  • On the other hand, pretty much all the patients/customers there were extremely old people who just plain no longer apparently had the mental faculties to know any better or the ability to  realize what was going on. I'm not an attorney, but this could easily be perceived as a case for elder abuse. Most insurance does not pay for frames and lenses, only for the exams.
At any rate, I mulled things over and cancelled my appointment. I may or may not work up the energy to look into this particular situation further.

The National Problem

[This page started out being about the actions of a single medical service provider. However it has now become about the national issue of medical service providers denying patients medical care unless the patient agrees  to sign what are known as SWAG CONTRACTS.]

Continuation and Update

I called the doctor's office. Yep, apparently most imaging/diagnostics centers are now pulling this stunt.

A patient being held responsible for a bill, because they falsely claimed they were insured, is indeed as it should be. However, a service provider attempting to force a patient to be held responsible for an insurer's breach of contract, bureaucracy, bad faith conduct, mistakes, or even just a misunderstanding is not.

The contract is between the service provider and the insurer, it is their responsibilities to understand and agree to the terms. Any attempt by a medical service provider to make a patient responsible for an insurer's actions is, to me, an essentially bad faith action on the part of the provider. Basically, the medical service provider is extorting the patient to insure the provider against the actions of the insurer, the threat being the withholding of needed medical care if the patient refuses to do so. In other words, patients are being forced to sign under duress.

Proposed Solution


Is it any wonder most countries think America has the most corrupt Medical Establishment on the planet? Our government keeps trying to fight it. But the greed and corruption is so entrenched, ingrained, embedded, and widespread (there are media reports almost daily on the subject) that nationalization of the medical industry may indeed be the only answer.

There would still be private sector medical professionals, but the government would be the single insurer and the only legally responsible payer. And it would be illegal for any private sector medical entity to try to coerce a patient into signing any sort of contract. Proof and authentication of identity would be all that is required, preauthorization for medical procedures implemented on an as needed basis. Premiums would be based on income.  Service providers (including hospitals) would no longer have to worry about being paid. Patients would no longer have to worry about being thrown into financial hardship or outright bankruptcy.

Meanwhile and for the time being, if a service provider hands you a contract such as the one I described in the above bulleted list.... Inform them that if they are unwilling to trust the insurer, then neither are you. You will no doubt immediately be thrown out, but at least you wont be a patsy.

You might try suggesting the service provider get preauthorization from the insurer. However and for some unknown reason, there are apparently some medical service providers who refuse to make the 3-minute phone call, the initially mentioned imaging and diagnostic center being one such case.

On a personal note, I am aware versions of this situation have been going on for decades. I have always circumvented the problem by simply adding the following sentence directly above my signature in caps:"ONLY PROVIDE INSURANCE COVERED SERVICES ONLY". The service provider then gets everything pre-authorized and there has never been a problem. As to why this particular, aforementioned imaging and diagnostic center is pulling this new stunt is beyond me. I live in a small town, hopefully the situation isn't as bad as the doctor's office has indicated and they can find a more ethical place to refer me.

This Has to Stop

A Bookmarks Reference List of Patients Bill of Rights Resources

I figured while I was at it, I might as well compile a list of resources regarding the rights patients are legally supposed to have. All listed websites are government or other well-known, reputable sources. All links go directly to the website's patients rights and assistance pages. I might add to this list from time to time.

Update:

List moved to Government Help for When Subjected to Medical Misconduct Victimization. Particularly relates to financial and billing misconduct.

Grocery Store Food Discrimination

Grocery store and supermarket chains discriminate against single people, divorced people, senior citizens, and anyone else who happens to live alone. Unless we are buying groceries for a family, the national chain grocery stores apparently don't want to bother with us. Or if they do, it looks like they want to charge us extra for the privilege.

Grocery store discrimination against senior citizens, singles, divorced, and anyone else who lives alone.

Having to buy four or five units of the same food item in order to get the discount sale price really does discriminate against singles, senior citizens, and other people who live alone. Only families can benefit from the use of this particular sales and marketing practice.

I’ve noticed this sales tactic is becoming more and more prevalent lately. Figured it was time to say something about it.

There really are very few people living alone who can make use of four boxes of crackers, five bottles of soda, four cans of tuna, and so forth.

And this buy-4-items and buy-5-items requirement to get various discounts is spreading to staple items. It is no longer limited to the more “frivolous” purchases.

In all fairness; it should be noted the grocery stores and supermarket chains doing this are not doing it to deliberately discriminate against singles, senior citizens, etc. They are doing this for the same reason they do all their other sales tactics; the purpose being to increase sales and maximize profits. Nothing wrong with that; that is capitalism.

The resulting discrimination against certain classes of people is simply the unintended consequence.  Basically, it's called collateral damage. Oh well, such is life.

Beware Consumer and Medical Contracts - Just Say No

Beware Patients and Consumer Contract Fraud - Contracts and the Law and You and the Judge - A short, cautionary note. Unethical contracts are the ultimate definition of SWAG (Stolen Without a Gun).


"But, your honor!?!" I said to the judge...

Judge, “You signed a contract.”

Me, “You mean that paragraph at the bottom of the application form?”

Judge, “Yes.”

Me, “But every bank in the country has that clause.”

Judge, “What clause?”

Me, “The sentence that says I’ve read and agreed to their charter; that I’ve read and agreed to all their bylaws; that I’ve read and agreed to all their rules and regulations. All of that stuff would be a stack of paper from the floor to the ceiling; and they wouldn’t even have copies at the branch for me to read anyway.”

Judge, “I know. But anything you sign is a contract.” (Side note: he is right.)

Me, “But every financial institution in the country has that clause.”

Judge, “I know.”

Me, “But if we don’t sign, we can’t get a checking account, savings account, credit card account or loan anywhere!”

Judge, “Sucks, doesn’t it?”

Me, “What do I owe?”

Judge, “Well, let’s see what they made up... Yep, that’s what you owe.”


The above story is fictional, but versions of it happen for real thousands of times every month. That is why I never do business with national banks or credit card companies. Finding a local credit union is the only way to go; they have versions of the same clause, but most of them are not thieves (see referenced article).

Needless to say, unethical consumer contracts don't just apply to national banks. In fact, there are credit card companies out there that are 10 times worse than any bank. Cable companies are another example, which is one reason why customers are leaving them in droves. Some cellphone carriers are also less than scrupulous, their contracts sometime include a clause stating you have to pay them even when they don't provide the agreed upon services. And then there is the worst of the worst, otherwise known as private sector contracts having to do with anything medical.

A Rant and Warning and Consumer Alert about Contracts

You have no civil rights when you blindly give them away by signing a multi-page, fine print contract without reading it. This happens all the time. The days of trusting an entity just because they are a large corporation or an established business are long gone. This is especially applicable as to credit card companies, medical entities, financial institutions, auto repair entities, and pretty much any and all other service-related entities. Corporate greed is the rule, not the exception.

Read the contract. If it’s too long for you to read and understand at the time, don’t sign it. If any of the print is too small for you to read, don’t sign it. If there is anything in it you don’t like or understand, don’t sign it. If it's incomplete, don't sign it. If you don't know what you are doing, don't sign it.

By definition anything you sign is a contract; whether it be just a single word, phrase, sentence, paragraph, or a hundred page document. Whenever someone tries to get you to sign something, it is for their benefit, not yours.

Reading a contract will give you an education; not reading a contract will give you an “adventure”.

Unethical contracts and incompetent/unethical civil laws victimize more people than all legally defined criminal activity combined. It is the ultimate definition of SWAG (Stolen without a Gun).

Beware contracts.

About Class Action Lawsuits... 

A class action lawsuit can result when a significant number of consumers have been victimized. Sometimes the company made an honest mistake, a defective product for example. Many times, however, class action lawsuits can result from SWAG consumer contracts or other behavior so egregious that it can't be covered up anymore. Personally, I think some of these cases should be in criminal court as opposed to civil court. If you happen to notice a class action lawsuit you are eligible to join as a member, you might as well sign up for it. You may not get much in the way of compensation, but at least you will get something.

Legal note: I am not an attorney, but one does not have to be a thief to recognize a theft.

Side note: The thief/theft reference is in regards to contracts, not attorneys. Any attorney or legal firm who specializes in protecting/helping consumers and patients are welcome to post links to their websites in the comments section below.

Lists of Vinegar and Baking Soda Uses for Cleaning and Other Purposes

Reference lists for cleaning and other uses for baking soda and vinegar.

Vinegar aka Weak Acetic Acid

Cleaning uses for vinegar.

The chemical name for vinegar is diluted acetic acid. As a mild acid it chemically reacts with many other compounds. The result is the removal of those compounds from places we want them removed, otherwise known as cleaning.

List of Vinegar Cleaning Uses

  • Windows
  • Mirrors
  • Do NOT use for TV’s, computer monitors, etc.
  • Shower heads
  • Kitchen counter tops
  • Coffee pots
  • Tea kettles
  • Wood floors (I’d test this on on a small spot first)
  • Toilet bowls
  • Sinks
  • Refrigerator
Non-cleaning uses for vinegar include cooking (of course), mixed with salt for killing weeds, mixed with baking soda for keeping drains clear.

Baking Soda aka Sodium bicarbonate

Cleaning and other uses for baking soda.

The chemical name for baking soda is sodium bicarbonate. As a mild, generally non-chemically-reactive abrasive, it can be used accordingly. It also absorbs odors.

List of Baking Soda Cleaning Uses

  • Teeth brightening
  • Absorbs and neutralizes heartburn acid
  • Putting box in refrigerator to absorb odors
  • Mixing into litter box absorbs odors
  • Keeping drains fresh
  • Removing grease from stove
  • Laundry spot cleaning
  • Adding to laundry as brightener
  • Sprinkling over carpets some time before vacuuming
  •  Other cleaning uses might be listed right on the box
  • And then naturally there’s the cooking thing.

I hope the above lists and information proves useful for folks.

And here's some worthy information on dusting.

How to Save Money on Groceries - A List

Saving Money on Food Is Easier Than One Thinks

Also a note about food government benefits during hard times.


Coupons and Websites

  • Yes, do use those coupons; the Sunday paper and your junk mail will give you all you need. Also drop by your main grocery store’s website and see what they have to say for themselves; more often than not, they will have additional digital coupons you can use where you simply enter your phone number at the checkout register to collect.

Generic Brands

  • Yes, do buy the generic store brands. It is common knowledge they cost less. What isn’t so well known is that more often than not they are made by the same manufacturer as the nationally labeled brands that cost up to twice as much.

Product Shelf Positioning

  • Make it a point to look at the top and bottom shelves. The middle shelves are where the high markup items are.

Unit Pricing

  • Do make it a habit to routinely check the unit pricing. No rocket surgeon degree required; the unit price is right below or beside the sale price. There will be at least one occasion every trip where it will affect your decision as to what to buy. Does your store not conveniently display the unit pricing? If so, then find another store. Also, you may be surprised to learn the larger sizes do not always represent the best unit pricing. Stores are sneaky that way, knowing that consumers automatically assume the larger size is the better deal.

Product Store Positioning and Impulse Buying

  • Never buy anything displayed at the register and checkout line. Those are what is known as spontaneous purchases and impulse items and always have the highest markup. Always bring a shopping list. It will cut down on your spontaneous impulse buying immensely. And while we are at it, never shop hungry.

Don't Pay for Unneeded Labor

  • Never buy premade sandwiches or other items requiring extra preparation in the deli section. The prices are highway robbery and are for people who are taking their lunch break from work, etc. If the sandwich looks delicious, then just buy the same filling from that same deli instead. This assumes you are willing enough to take the contents from the container and put between two slices of bread yourself. Chicken salad and egg salad are good examples. Doing this will usually save you between $2 to $3 per sandwich. And save the containers, they can repeatedly be used for freezing and storing leftovers.

Stock Up on Non-Perishable Sale Items

  • Prices can vary by as much as 50% from week to week. Tissues are an excellent example of this. Canned goods are another excellent example. Some juices also have long expiration dates.

Check Your Receipt for Double Billing

  • It happens a lot more often than you think. It usually happens because either the cashier doesn’t like you or the scanner sensor is dirty. And checking the receipt really is easier than you think; even a long receipt takes less than a minute to quickly glance through. At minimum, at least check the higher priced items. When you find something (and you inevitably will), simply return to the same register and tell them. They will refund your money on the spot.

Never Set Your Wallet on the Counter at the Checkout

  • Sooner or later, you will inevitably forget and leave it there when you walk out of the store. It won't always still be there when you go back for it.

Fewer Trips

  • Every trip you make to the store probably costs you between $2 to $4 in gas. Try to organize to make fewer trips.


Government Food Benefits

Btw, Food Stamps aka CalFresh aka SNAP benefits are used by millions of Americans and residents. If your financial situation is truly grim, it is worth investigating.

Government Websites to Get Started

https://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/apply
https://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/supplemental-nutrition-assistance-program-snap
https://www.fns.usda.gov/snap/eligibility

How RFIDs Work and Examples

RFID technology. Welcome to your future. The future is now.



What Is, About, and How RFIDs Work.

RFID is the acronym for Radio Frequency Identification Device. In other words, it is a small microchip that broadcasts whatever information is put in it. These devices have been around for years.

Las Vegas casinos put them in their higher denomination chips. So when you walk around the casino, show up at a blackjack table etc.; casino personnel know about those chips in your pocket.

Retail stores randomly hide small, button-sized RFID’s or their equivalent in their merchandise throughout the store. So if you pick up an item and “forget” to pay for it, when you try walking through the scanners at the front door; you are dead. A word to the wise.

As far as I’m concerned, so far so good as to the above uses for RFID’s. Nailing shoplifters is always a good thing. And as for Las Vegas, I haven't been there in decades.

Unfortunately, it’s not going to end there.Welcome to your future (actually, it's already here).

RFID microchips have arrived on credit cards, debit cards, and drivers licenses in some states. In many cases, all one has to do is just wave their card at the point-of-sale (POS) machine to complete a transaction, or maybe even just stand in front of the thing.

Unfortunately, there is also a very deleterious offshoot to this technology. Namely, anyone with a scanner can just stand close to you and instantly acquire your card account number and possibly all your personal information. ID theft is entering a whole, new realm.

And if you happen to have a specific store credit card when you visit that store, the employees will instantly know everything you ever bought there, the last time you visited, your home address and telephone number, etc.

All of this is not a good thing…

How to Block RFIDs and RFID Scanners

However, there are ways to combat this vulnerability. There are already metal cases and such that you can buy online to prevent this kind of ID theft, simply place the cards in the metal envelope to prevent information access. The store thing doesn’t bother me that much, but a person standing close to me in the checkout line is an entirely different matter, or someone "accidentally” bumping into you on the street, etc.

Personally, the first one of these cards I'm forced to use, I’ll try wrapping it in aluminum foil and see if that works.

Hopefully this post will prevent an ID theft or two.

The Pizza and Other Fast Food Delivery Ad and Leaflet Scam

Scam Alert

Yes, the credit card thieves are still doing this. Do you live in an apartment complex or are planning on staying in a hotel, motel, or resort soon? Well, there's a not-so-new scam in town. It has to do with when you find a pizza menu or other food delivery leaflet or ad slid under your door or placed on your porch. Just where did that ad really come from?

The Front Door Menu Con

It works quite simply really.

You find a pizza menu or other fast food leaflet or ad slid under your door or on your porch.

Feeling inspired, you call and place your order, giving them the requested credit or debit card info.

Alas, the phone number on that menu did not go to a pizza place or any other fast food or restaurant business. It went to a thief and your credit line or checking account will be maxed out or emptied within the hour.

And now you are going to have to deal with your credit card company or bank and get those $5000 worth of new charges all straightened out. Even worse, in many states debit cards do not have the same consumer protections that credit cards have; you might actually be liable for the charges.

So next time you find a leaflet or other ad outside your door or on your porch, check the Yellow Pages or internet to verify the validity of the phone number first.

May all your pizza and other food order experiences be of the benign kind.

How to Save Money on College / University Textbooks - Bookstore Alternatives

Updated for Year 2019

Text Book Buying and Renting Tips and Tricks Guide for Saving Money on School Books

How to and Where to Buy School and College Textbooks for Cheap and Save Money
Bookstore Alternatives


Spending Money on Textbooks

Everyone is pretty much fed-up with the extortionist pricing practices of college textbook publishers. Fortunately, more and more textbook buying alternatives are becoming available to combat this. This page will cover the various textbook buying options that are available to you. Renting textbooks is also discussed. And there are a few useful links here and there.

Saving Money on Textbooks

Buying New Hardcover

For subjects relating directly to your major, you probably want to buy a new, combined hardcover and DVD. You will want to keep the textbook, both as a reference and for the memories. Regretfully, this does limit your choices.

You will find a wide disparity in textbook pricing. In addition to checking the bookstore price; it would be wise to check the textbook prices from at least two other random vendors. Note the exact title, author, publishing date, and ISBN. You will also want to note the used textbook price for reference purposes. If you are early enough, you might find an unmarked-up copy; it happens. Find out the textbook buyback price while you are at it; however, there are no guarantees that the price will still be the same at the end of the semester.

Go to your search engine and enter: ISBN "0-395-62883-0" price. Substitute your ISBN and be sure it’s in quotes. Be very sure to look beyond the first page of results. The wide disparity in textbook prices will become apparent, both new and used. You will also begin to get a good idea as to who are the better sellers. Do this for all your ISBN’s.

Buying Used Hardcover

There are lots of options here.

Most of the information described in “Textbooks: Buying New” also applies to buying used.

Check out all bulletin boards. This includes the bookstore, cafeteria(s), the building where your class is located, the department building for your class subject, libraries, dorms, and even student-favored local shops and stores. Also check if there are any textbook related local online bulletin boards.

Track down the instructor. Does the instructor have extra copies? Does the instructor have any advice?

Network, ask around; everyone is talking about textbook prices and availability anyway. Find out what information is out there. Especially do this as you are going around checking the bulletin boards.

Buying Electronic/Digital

Your textbook may be available digitally. Most of the information above applies here as well.
  • Do a search for: ebook textbook.
  • Do a search for: textbook ebook.
  • Do a search for: online textbook.
  • Do a search for: textbook online.
Network and ask around.

Does the bookstore have an eBook Section yet? Don’t forget to factor in the cost of the reader.

Renting Textbooks

Renting is an option for many textbooks. Be sure to check the pricing from more than one vendor.
  • Do a search for: textbook rent.
  • Do a search for: rent textbook.
Network and ask around.

Does the bookstore have a Rental Section or option yet?

A Note:

There are media reports about on-campus theft problems. Never leave your textbooks or other belongings unattended.

Consumer Information Websites List and More - Includes Dot Com Boom & Bust Era

Updated for 2019

This is rather a unique list. In addition to the current useful resources, there are also a lot of companies and other resources from the infamous boom & bust dot com era; it is is interesting what some of those companies are up to these days. I do my best to keep this page current; if a broken link does show up, please let me know via the comments section below. Also, an important security note: if "https" is not available, it would be wise to not go there.


Resource Description - Worthy Consumer Resources
JDpower Consumer product information.
ConsumersReview Consumers Review listings and reviews.
ConsumerReports Consumer product information. Free and fee based service.
RipOffReport Consumer complaints about specific entities.
cnet Consumer tech product information.
wisebread Living large on a small budget.
SalesCircular Best current deals at retail stores.
FatWallet Advance info on sales.
SlickDeals Deals info.



Resource Description
gifts Intelligent directory of products.
LetsTalk Compare cell-phone plans.
WorthGuide ebay ref guide for merchandise value.
AuctionGuild Industry watchdog. Useful info.
PayPal Reputable online payment service.
CraigsList Online classified ads. Be careful here.


Resource Description - Worthy Consumer Resources
Credit Union Nat'l Association Locate a credit union near you.
DoNotCall Federal telemarketer Do-Not-Call list.
AnnualCreditReport Legit free credit reports site.
SmartMoney All sorts of useful info.
DealMine Discount aggregator and cross-reference site.
GetHuman Dealing with Corporate America by phone.
iHateDebt Dealing with debt problems. Information, free and fee.
travelaxe Directory. Compare hotel prices.
hotels Compare hotel prices.
BBB Better Business Bureau.
CreditUnionsOnline Locate a local credit union.
Quotesmith Online insurance quotes.
Insurance Panda Online insurance quotes.
BankRate Interest rates comparison.
HSH Associates Mortgage rate information, more.
Insure.com News, company fin'l info, more.
SampleSale Clothing & housewares sales list, more.
Consumer World Information.
ConsumerProAssoc Information and many links.
epinions Information and many links.
FTC Federal Trade Commission.
C.I.C. Federal Consumer Information Catalog.
FDIC Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.

Books/Mags Description
amazon All.
barnesandnoble All.
half All. Owned by ebay.
abebooks All.
magazinepricesearch Price comparisons.
studentbookworld New text books.
campusbooks Text books. Connects buyers/sellers, new/used, more.
collegebooksdirect Text books. Buy/sell used.
textbookrevolution.org Student run. Free educational materials.
librarything Organizational resource.

Resource Description
Junk Busters Stop telephone solicitors, junk mail, more.
Scam Busters Information.
spamlinks .net Spam track & trace.
C.A.U.C.E. Anti-spam site.
N.S.I. Scam alerts and information.
N.F.I.C. The National Fraud Information Center.
ic3 Internet Crime Complaint Center.
Nolo Legal self help, more.
lawyers Legal info, more.

Resource All Things Real Estate....
Fannie Mae Foreclosed homes, much more....
Freddie Mac HomeSteps. Foreclosed homes, much more....
MoveUp Research home value.
HomeAdvisor Houses, Apts, Neighborhood research.
HomeShark Info on buying a home, more.
APBnews Crime info by zipcode, more.
IRED Directory of real estate websites, more.
AllApartments All things apartment related.
SpringStreet All things apartment related.